Currently viewing the tag: "American Art"

The Pantone Color Institute recently announced their 2018 Color of the Year, a “dramatically provocative and thoughtful purple shade,” PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet. Smithsonian American Art Museum staff promptly cranked up “Purple Rain” radio and searched the museum’s collection for purple tones, discovering a variety of artworks, some of which we didn’t remember having seen before. Here […]

Continue Reading

Gene Kloss felt that immersion in nature was essential to the production of art. Her paintings and etchings were directly informed by nature and she couldn’t conceive of making art any other way. “An artist must keep in close contact with nature… in order to produce a significant body of work,” she […]

Continue Reading

Before Betsy Broun retired from the helm of the Smithsonian American Art Museum last fall, she gave a talk where she revealed her top ten works (ok, seventeen works) of art in the collection, beginning with Albert Pinkham Ryder’s Jonah. Ryder, who died one hundred years ago, was an artist […]

Continue Reading

Guest blogger Jean Lawlor Cohen is the consulting curator for Gene Davis: Hot Beat. She is an arts writer, independent curator, and co-author of Washington Art Matters: Art Life in the Capital 1940-1990.

Gene Davis, a journalist before he was a painter, knew the power of words. He spoke his wise […]

Continue Reading

Question: Who was Stanton Macdonald-Wright and what was the Synchrome Kineidoscope?

Answer: Stanton Macdonald-Wright (1890-1973) was an American painter, writer, experimental artist, and teacher most well-known for the abstract painting style called Synchromism, which he developed with fellow American painter Morgan Russell.

Born in Virginia and raised in California, Macdonald-Wright began […]

Continue Reading

Five Georgia O’Keeffe paintings in the current exhibition, Cross Currents: Modern Art from the Sam Rose and Julie Walters Art Collection, create a mini exhibition in themselves. Beautifully rendered in her undeniable palette, they are naturescapes or deeply realized meditations on the natural world. Even when the scene is a window ledge in Manhattan with […]

Continue Reading

This post is part of an ongoing series on Eye Level: Q and Art, where American Art’s Research department brings you interesting questions and answers about art and artists from our archive.

Edward Hopper’s Cape Cod Morning

Question: In Edward Hopper’s Cape Cod Morning, what is the woman looking at?

[…]

Continue Reading